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BASS GUITAR TO UPRIGHT BASS: The Top Ten mistakes migrating players make...
Recent News and Updates
Traditional NXTs IN STOCK
Get yours now!
This is an amazing value -- for our upright bass-playing friends who want an EUB that can "sub" for the big bass, we've done all the upgrades for you -- and even put a custom "traditional" finish on the bass.

You get all the modern ergonomics and portability of the NS Design Electric Uprights, but with the Traditional string set for a more authentic doublebass sound (and bowability). We've also had NS Design upgrade the tuners to the CR-spec Schallers. And the cool traditional brown finish, over the veneer, looks classy and traditional -- and we even include a set of f-hole decals you can optionally install on the bass.

The four-string is the NEW NXTa "active" model, with the built-in flash-rechargeable buffer circuit. We have a limited number of 5-strings left in the original passive design, and those are the last of the traditional 5-strings.

You can't get this exclusive model anywhere else, folks.

Read more!
McNutt Bass Cradles IN STOCK
The McNutt Bass Cradle is a super Low-Profile Bass Stand that holds your bass securely, at an angle, for easy access. Stable, and surprisingly lightweight, it's portable enough for gigging (it comes with a shoulder bag) and works nice at home, too! Great in a show pit for quick switches between electric and upright, too! Now IN STOCK for immediate shipment.

Recently Added Products
Genzler Bass Array Magellan 350/BA 10 1x10 Small Combo
Genzler Bass Array Magellan 350/BA 10 1x10 Small Combo
The wizard who brought you those great sounding amps (with a similar name) is back! This small combo has the flexibility, hi-fi transparent sound, and great design -- in a portable package -- that you would expect from Jeff Genzler...
• 15.5”W x 15”D x 16”H, 25 Lbs • 175w (350 w/added cab) and 1x10 speaker with array
Grace Design BiX - One Channel Mini Preamp
Grace Design BiX - One Channel Mini Preamp
This item is made in USA!And Baby Makes Three! The newest model from Grace is the diminutive BiX - scaled down to the bare essentials, for maximum affordability and portability. Making world-class preamplification available to even the most frugal bassists...
Headway EDB-2 Dual Channel Blending Preamp with Mic Input
Headway EDB-2 Dual Channel Blending Preamp with Mic Input
This versatile 2-channel preamp can handle two pickups, or a pickup and a mic, with ease, with extensive EQ, notch filter, DI, phantom power, switchable impedance, and much more.
(not in any particular order)
  1. Thinking that Upright Bass is just a big bass guitar. It isn't. It's a very different animal. Be prepared to learn an instrument that is completely new to you. And while they are tuned the same, you seldom play as many notes as you might play on a bass guitar. You use different techniques, and play using an entirely different mindset.

  2. Using Bass Guitar plucking techniques on an Upright Bass. Don't play with the tips of your fingers, curl your finger a bit and play with the side of your finger, put some meat on it for a big sound. And don't pluck it, pull it back and let go cleanly so the moving string doesn't scrape against your skin. If you want a big sound, play big!

  3. Gripping the neck like a baseball bat when stopping (putting your finger in place) a note. Your position in relation to the bass (rear corner) should allow you to apply leverage using bass against your body so you pull back against the fingerboard with your fingers. This allows pressure to be applied more naturally, freely, and without clamping down.

  4. Calling the fingerboard the fretboard. There are no frets. (You don't want other players to make fun of you.)

  5. Buying cheap and getting cheap. Tools don't make the carpenter, but crappy ones can affect the project. The instrument, bridge, strings, etc., all contribute to the sound, and poor results discourage progress and reflect poorly on the musician trying to overcome inferior tools. If that's all you can handle, do everything you can to make it perform up to its potential, leading to...

  6. Living with a poorly set up instrument. Playing upright bass is enough of a challenge, why handicap yourself? Invest in yourself and have the bass' playbility maximized by a pro, and if you can't -- visit my Double Bass Links Page to find all the wonderful resources out there to help you learn more about doing it yourself.

  7. Believing what another person who plays upright bass says. Also, buying into Internet wisdom based on frequency rather than accuracy. Everybody has opinions, I seem to remember a saying about that... Regardless, life is like the internet, you have to consider the credibility of the source when you read the words. Worthwhile opinions usually come from people with a wider range of experience, and the length of a player's experience does not necessarily make it quality information. The net is a wonderful resource, do your research before buying into "the best strings I've every played" when the writer is someone who has only ever played two different string types in his life. In fact, you better check to see if this Bob Gollihur guy knows what he is talking about.

  8. Ignoring the bow -- don't. Using a bow when practicing is a great tool for discovering your intonation... or the lack of it. We can get away with murder when plucking; bowing reveals the true pitch and helps you to correct bad intonation. Also... when you successfully draw out your first big open E string note using the bow, you'll really understand what playing bass is all about! Get a decent horsehair bow and don't cheap out on rosin(s); you're going to love it!

  9. Not getting lessons from a competent teacher. If you don't learn the fundamentals of baseball you'll never be a decent player. Same thing goes with bass playing. If your budget is tight, at least get a couple introductory lessons to start off on the right foot. And refer to #7 - anybody can say they are an upright bass teacher. Lessons from a schooled player will probably be more valuable.

  10. Not practicing or playing enough. Take every opportunity to play with others, especially if they are better than you are, but also if they are not. Listen, interact musically, and learn. But then... that goes for any instrument, doesn't it?



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The Fine Print:

The information contained herein is based on what's in my brain — and/or my observations and opinions from my personal experiences (and those of Bob, before me) — as of this moment today, and is subject to change. I'm sure that a great deal more information and detail could be added — but the intent of these writings is to present easily understood, quick FAQs, to address common questions and improve the reader's general knowledge.

What's written here is by no means any kind of authoritative absolute answer, for I am not the world's greatest authority on bass (not even close), or on much of anything else, for that matter. So, by all means, get a second opinion, and know that all the information provided here is for general informational purposes only. I am not providing professional advice; be aware that, where applicable, any information acted upon is at your own risk.

I simply and sincerely hope the information and opinions here are helpful to you on your quest for knowledge about the bass and related subjects... that's the point!

I welcome email with dissenting and additional viewpoints/information/updates that help improve my personal awareness and these content pages. If you have a question that you think belongs here, please let me know.
Mark