Jargar Handmade Upright Bass Strings

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Description

Jargar has been making strings for orchestral instruments by hand in Copenhagen, Denmark, since 1956. These strings share their general construction (steel rope core) with Corelli 370's, but they have a very different vibe, thanks to some additional dampening materials. They are hand-wound with thin threads of metal - "aluminum, copper and different alloys," according to the manufacturer.

What you get is a steel string with a softer, easier feel - and a surprisingly non-metallic-sound. They have sort of a "gut-like" top end, with their shorter sustain, thuddier attack, and warm tone. They're also good under the bow; relatively easy to bow without scratchiness, and a big, dark arco sound. Lots of body, less definition. But this may be a good thing, depending on your needs. They have a nice "body," and are easy on the hands.

These strings have been reported as a favorite by everyone from orchestral bassists to rockabilly players; their soft feel and darker, gut-like vibe (but durable steel construction) can actually make them a good choice for slappers who aren't getting what they're looking for from gut or synthetic strings.

Rockabilly players often choose the Dolce (light) model for their lighter tension, which makes them more slap-friendly.

String gauges (mediums):

    • G: .051/1.31mm
    • D: .064/1.64mm
    • A: .079/2.02mm
    • E: .109/2.79mm


Note that the Forte strings are a little thicker, and the Dolce strings are a little thinner, than the medium strings.
Gauge Identification

  • Forte: Red colored winding at ball end, blue colored winding at pegbox end
  • Medium: Blue colored windings at both ends
  • Dolce: Green colored windings at both ends
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3 Reviews

  • 5
    Round, full and rich

    Posted by George B on Oct 31st 2015

    Hello Mark, Just wanted to send some feed back regarding Jargar strings vs Thomastik Spirocores. I changed just the low E, first, and the Jargar was rounder with less sustain -- but less loud. (That said,) I am happy with the results, because even though the Spiros sound a little louder and brighter un amplified, I do like the sound of the Jargars with the Realist pickup: Full, deep and rich sounding... like an upright should! They also work well with the Schaller Mag pickup I have installed.

  • 5
    Great match for my bright bass

    Posted by Chuck M. on Jan 11th 2014

    Mark, We recently talked on the phone and you recommended the Jargar strings for my Christopher laminated bass. I played my first gig with the bass last night and am very pleased with the tone and feel of the strings. (This) bass was very bright and harsh sounding with Spirocores and the Jargar strings are a good match on this bass. One of the players on the gig remarked that the bass had a nice Milt Hinton vibe to it with the new strings. Just wanted to thank you for your help, Mark.

  • 5
    Warn and wonderful

    Posted by Corky W on Jun 21st 2012

    I installed the Jargar Medium strings on my plywood "work" bass this morning. I was pleasantly surprised at the initial tone, as I expected the strings to be a little brighter since they are steel core. However, they sound warm and wonderful. The E string seemed to have a little weaker sound than the other three, but not enough to cause concern. I "toyed" with the "Full Circle" adjustment and I believe that on this particular bass the best sound seems to be when the pick-up is turned at about a 45 degree to the bridge foot. Thank you for that tip.

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